portrait photographer

One Park with 15 Looks - Meyer Memorial Trust Team Portraits and Headshots

We recently finished a set of corporate headshots and portraits for the Meyer Memorial Trust team and Trustees.  Meyer Memorial Trust is an amazing organization that "works with and invests in organizations, communities, ideas and efforts that contribute to a flourishing and equitable Oregon."

Fred G. Meyer, upon his death in 1978, left $60 million for a charitable foundation with few mandates. “Realizing as I do the uncertainties of the future, I want my trustees to be able to exercise broad discretion in shaping and carrying out charitable programs which can be tailored to fit changing conditions and problems.” Now almost 40 years later, Meyer has paid out nearly $692 million through more than 8,200 grants and program related investments.

With such an amazing history and an amazing group, we knew we had to have some pretty fabulous portraits to match.  For the team images we managed to do them all in one location, The Fields Park, in downtown Portland. The space has everything you could want, greenery, bridges, plus an urban feel. This allowed the images to feel consistant, yet diverse. For the Trustees images we photographed them in spaces that meant something to them, their homes, the waterfront, the Salem Carousel. We feel honored to be a part of this community-driven organization that gives back to much and pleased that we could create a set of images that shows just how open, dedicated, and darn good-looking they are.

The Art of Losing - An Environmental Portrait with Author Patrick Dewitt - Tech Talk

Portland Author Patrick Dewitt has just finished another amazing new book Under Major Domo Minor and sat down for a portrait as moody as his writing. To create this image Christopher used three Profoto flash heads, 2 Profoto B1's and a Profoto B2. We really like using the Profoto B1's and B2's since they're holy trinity of lights - powerful, compact, and mobile (no cables). Once we dialed in our composition, we start to add light to create the scene. The first light, our "main" light was a B1 on a C-stand with a simple zoom reflector placed outside the window camera left. This gives us a nice natural but dramatic looking key light. Our second light needs to create dimension and depth to the image. This is done by adding a B1 on a short stand with no modifiers and placed back inside the room on the right. Used here as a hair light, by pointing the light down at the floor it gives an interesting skip-bounce effect creating the illusion of a light coming in from the next room.  Our third light is a B2 with a small 2' OCF Octabox, with grid, about 3 feet to camera right. This is used as a subtle fill flash for the table and Patrick. More tech talk coming soon. Have questions about what we're doing behind the scenes? Shoot us an email at hello@nashcophoto.com

Editorial Portrait Photoshoot for AARP Oregon

Always a pleasure to create environmental  portraiture for AARP.  They always do such a great job covering some pretty important issues for those over 50, and it is great to hang out with people that have so much life history to share.  

Over the last year we did a myriad of stories for them, including a story about how many older adults who were laid off during the recession were caught in limbo until their Medicare kicked in. Kathleen McCann, who we photographed in her amazing forest of a backyard says that without Medi­caid to close Medicare gaps, she would be overwhelmed by hospital, doctor and prescription drug bills.  

Then we shot RCA Moore for a story about family caregivers and how a new law called the CARE Act is being put in place to help keep them informed and involved. RCA was a caregiver for his wife but said he often didn't know how to help her.  

Next was Debi Friedlander and how she sometimes experiences food insecurity. Debi, a photographer herself, was a fantastic subject and her husband even lent us the light to put inside the fridge for the photoshoot, now that is teamwork.   

Finally is Kathy Goeddel, who has volunteered for over 30 years at Tax Aide, created in 1968 to helps seniors and low- to moderate-income individuals file their income taxes so they don’t miss a single deduction or credit. I sat in on one of her classes, and wouldn't have wanted to try an do it on my own!

Thanks to all these folks who shared a glimpse of their worlds with us. 

Mother Jones Magazine Talks Rape

Photographed spitfire Jenny Wendt for a Mother Jones Magazine story on statute of limitations for sexual assaults.  Jenny, who was raped in 2005, has begun a campaign to change Indiana's laws, addressing rallies and meeting with legislators and is now working with lawmakers in Oregon.  A serious topic calls for some serious images, but Jenny's personality is one of joy, warmth and humor.  Well that and a will of steel.20141110_Wendt_026 20141110_Wendt_017 20141110_Wendt_036 20141110_Wendt_047 20141110_Wendt_004

Faces of the Affordable Care Act - Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal asked us to photograph local business owner and motorcycle enthusiast Tom Daly for a series called Faces of the Affordable Care Act. Tom represents The 'Young Invincible,' who is interested in health insurance, but decided it was too expensive.  However, his new motorcycle habit, impending marriage and recent status as homeowner have made him rethink this opinion.  Adulthood will do that to you I guess.  

Teacher of the Year, Jeff Charbonneau for Ed Tech Magazine

Spent the day playing with vials, beakers and all things science for our Cover Shoot for EdTech Magazine with 2013 National Teacher of the year, Jeffrey Charbonneau.  The Science and Engineering teacher graces the halls of Zillah High School, the very same school he graduated from.  Talk about your high school flashbacks.  At least he knows all the good make out spots.  Seriously though, as we roamed the halls with Jeff, he got a greeting or a hug from almost every student we passed.  Coming from a family of teachers, I know they don't always get their due.  Glad in the case of Jeffrey, someone noticed.

Reed College Roundup - 2013

Quite a 2013 for Reed College and NashCO.  They got a new Performing Arts Building, we got to be there when the confetti was flying and along with a variety of amazing college students, classes and alumni events. We're really excited to see how they used our photos in all the Reed College collateral!  You can see more of our college and university photography under the Learning Tab: College Life

Pigs N' a Blanket - 1859 Magazine - In Print

Perfect weather, perfect subjects, not so well-behaved piglets.  Well, two out of three ain't bad. We spent the day at Worden Hill Farm with the uber photogenic Ortloff Family, Susan and Wolfgang, and their three bewitching daughters; Kate, Hadley and Mia for the cover of 1859 Magazine.  They bought the land from Susan's parents back in 2007 and left an urban lifestyle in Germany for mud-splattered days in Dundee, OR.  We were wooed by the multitude of pig sizes, varying from holdable to rideable.  We were also wooed by the family, who shared some of their cured pork and promised to invite us to their next bonfire.  After a day of mucking around, dodging porkers who thought our feet looked like apples (note to self: do not wear red boots when photographing pigs) Susan waved good-bye and said cheerfully, "You don't think you smell, but you do."

MusicFest NW is Rubbish - Willamette Week Cover

You never exactly know how it is going to go with celebrities.  Perhaps spending your life with people that never tell you no can have a warping effect.

Thankfully this diva mentality was delightfully absent from Fred Armisen, of Portlandia fame.  I can never decide if that show is funny or not and if audiences from Mid-Western states would want to hug me or shoot if we were ever to meet.

Fred showed up as his alter ego, 70s-era punk rocker Ian Rubbish, for the shoot.  At first I was afraid that he was going to talk in a British accent for the duration.  In which case I'm afraid I would have had a hard time keeping it together, persistent giggles making it difficult to push the shutter.  But no, though dressed as Ian, Fred played himself, a very sweet, laid back guy, who was game for whatever wacky things I could think of.  

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